WHY NOT? (by Jon Shuler)

There were 40 people in the classroom for the fifth and final session. There had been 40 in the room for the first one. It had never happened in my years as a leader before, the numbers never declined, and I took it as a good sign. But I was wrong.

 I was trying, again, to impart to a group of adult church goers that the number one responsibility of a Christian, who has grown up, is to be a disciple-maker. I had taught only the words of Jesus. Nothing else. No other books than the Holy Scriptures. No videos. No other program than the clear words of Jesus.

Three months later I returned to the parish, and found that 5 of the 40 had actually done “something” with the teaching. One was reading daily only from one of the four gospels – for the first time. A chapter a day. He was trying to learn to “abide in my word,” as Jesus said a true disciple would. Another was meditating on a small portion of the gospel each day. Two others had begun to disciple another person since the class. One had reoriented the emphasis of his weekly bible study group to being more focused on discipling than study. Five out of forty beginning to make a change. Five out of forty. Only 12 &1/2 %.

For those five my heart was glad.

The amazing thing was, all 40 said: “It was a great class.” Many of them said: “I really learned something.”

But what I found was 35 Christians who are – apparently – used to learning things, but doing nothing with the learning. Changing nothing. Hearing Jesus words, but NOT taking them as from the Lord to be obeyed. And I ask myself: “Why not?”

Since 1988 I have been trying to learn how to be a disciple-making disciple, and a disciple-making leader. I have grown much through these 30 years. I am grateful to God for all that he has shown me. But I find very few other ordained leaders who are engaged in the same quest. And I ask myself: Why not?”

I wonder if you who are reading this have ever asked this question? How is it that the church of Jesus Christ could be filled with people and leaders who have steadfastly ignored the Final Command, yet continue to think of themselves as good Christian people?

Today some you who are reading could make a decision to change how you use your time in obedience to the Lord, and do so. You could resolve to find someone to help you become a disciple-making disciple. But if you read this and do not, I ask you: “Why not?”

— Revd. Jon Shuler
NAMS Servant General

WHY NOT? (by Jon Shuler)

NAMS Blog – Sold out for Jesus (by Manik Corea)

Recently, when teaching in our NAMS Latin America meetings, I shared a cogent definition of discipleship by the late Dallas Willard:

“A disciple is a person who has decided that the most important thing in their life is to learn how to do what Jesus said to do.” [1]

The late, great Christian singer Keith Green likewise gave a simple and memorable description of a genuine Christian: ‘One who is bananas for Jesus’.

Both definitions were true to Jesus’ words (Luke 6:46, 14:25-33, Matthew 28:20).

The highest place in our lives must belong to Jesus. This means He gets the first and final call over what we do with our money, time, possession and energies and over every life critical issue, opportunity, relationship and circumstance that is ours.

He demands that all our dreams and ambitions be laid at His feet in total surrender. The call to discipleship is not, and has never been, a popular message. Sinners after all prefer their way to God’s, and sin is essentially civil war against the rule and reign of God over us.

What is truly heart-breaking, though, is how very few of us who call ourselves Christians are likewise willing to accede full control to Jesus in the same way. We want Him to save us from hell in the next world, but to pander and be subservient to our wants and desires in this. If you’re like me, we easily hold back the more precious parts of our lives from Him.

But we cannot have it both ways. Jesus didn’t come so the ‘faithful’ could simply be comfortable and fed.

There are so very many people – some live across your street, others across the oceans – that remain ignorant, apathetic or simply have no access to the message of God’s love and salvation in Christ Jesus.[ii]

John Wesley famously said, ‘the world is my parish.’ Today, for most faithful Christians, the parish has become their world.

Despite ostentatious talk about missions, many evangelical churches spend more money, time and effort on their own buildings, staff, programs and services to meet the needs of their members or attendees than they do on reaching the unreached, making disciples or helping to plant new mission-centered churches. Global mission is hardly a concern for the average Christian in most parts of the globe.

This is borne out by damning statistics like the following:

A meager 0.1% of the estimated US$53 trillion that Christians the world over will earn this year will be given towards Christian mission.[iii]

Christians make up 33% of the world’s population, receive 53% of the world’s annual income but spend 98% of it on themselves.[iv]

It is patently clear to us in NAMS that God has called us to play our part in awakening His sleeping Church to obedience to Jesus’ final command to make disciples of all nations.

To do that, we must ourselves be sold out to Jesus. There can be no compromise.

My prayer and passionate hope as Global Executive of NAMS is that every NAMS Companion will be a bona-fide all-out, disciple-making, Spirit-filled, Jesus-pleasing Word-abiding, rabid seeker of the lost, like our Master. And that we would find and raise others to be the same.

It is enough, as Jesus said, for the disciple to become like his master. (Matthew 10:25).

Will you pray, support and join us in this glorious, all-or-nothing endeavor?


[1] Dallas Willard, ‘Rethinking Evangelism’, Cutting Edge Magazine, Vol 5, No. 1 (Winter 2001)

[ii] Globally, it is estimated that a staggering 80% of all non-Christians (i.e. majority of which are Buddhists, Hindus and Muslims) in our world do not personally know another Christian. http://www.gordonconwell.edu/resources/documents/1IBMR2015.pdf – see section on ‘Personal Contact’ for how this figure was derived.

[iii] https://factsandtrends.net/2016/12/12/10-key-trends-in-global-christianity-for-2017/ based on http://www.gordonconwell.edu/ockenga/research/documents/StatusofGlobalChristianity2017.pdf

[iv] David Barret and Todd Johnson, World Christian Trends AD 30- AD 2200, (William Carey Library:Pasadena, 2001), 656.





NAMS Blog – Sold out for Jesus (by Manik Corea)

Surprised By An Old Story (By Revd Martin Gornick)

Sometimes I get surprised by an old story in the Scriptures. The story of Naaman the leper is one such story. 27 verses in the 5th chapter of 2 Kings dramatically recount his story. As the verses begin to add up, we read of God’s step by step mercies of moving this leper to an encounter with Israel’s prophet and his incredible healing from the scourge of leprosy. God sovereignly moves people into each other’s lives, sparks key conversations, and strategically shapes circumstances that will culminate in the miracle. The clear unfolding of God’s plan throughout the story inspires as much as Naaman’s miracles where his “flesh was restored like the flesh of a little child, and he was clean.”

I love this story of faith and whenever I recall it I always think “Naaman the leper.” Even though the story ends with “Naaman the healed” I still think “Naaman the leper” as if it is his name.

So I was surprised when God led me through the familiar story and showed me that other things were said about Naaman… “commander of the king of the army of Syria,” “was a great man,” and “by him the LORD had given victory to Syria,” and “He was a mighty man of valor.” (2 Kings 5:1).

The leper was a successful warrior leader even used by God in a military campaign to accomplish His will. He was respected and cared for by the slave girl in his household – the very one who would bring the message of hope about the prophet in Israel. When Naaman approached his own king for permission to travel to Israel to seek the help of the prophet, the king’s generous response indicates again that Naaman is a man worthy of consideration and respect. Everyone around him in the story speaks well and wants to help this man.

Even though I was well acquainted with how the story ends I still thought of him as “the leper.” And then I saw in verse 1: “He was a mighty man of valor, but he was a leper.” In my spirit I saw that Naaman’s primary identity was not leprosy.

Hidden in Naaman’s story is an important principle: he never let his problem define him. His disease did not stop him from raising family or serving as commander. I tend to think that he thought of himself as Naaman the commander, not Naaman the leper.

In NAMS we’ve learned to hold dear those gospel verses where Jesus speaks of “my disciples.”[1] We’ve come to understand that our primary identity is disciple, follower of Jesus. Being with Jesus in intimate fellowship and doing what Jesus did in making disciples defines our discipleship. Yet, our identity is simply: follower of Jesus, child of God. We are not our problems, our weaknesses, our failures or even our successes. Our ministry or the fruit of our ministry is not to defines us. All disciple-making ministry is to flow out of our identity as those who are loved and discipled by Jesus Himself.


[1] Luke 14:26, 27 and 33; John 8:31; John 13:34,35, John 15:8


— Revd. Martin Gornick
NAMS Prior General
Rector; Apostle Anglican Church, Lexington KY

Surprised By An Old Story (By Revd Martin Gornick)

Raising up a new generation (By Isaac Lasky).

‘The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The next best time is now.’ So goes an old Chinese proverb.

Indeed, we were all once saplings that were cared for and invested in by godly people who by God’s grace helped us to become trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord (Isaiah 61:3). The NAMS Global Apprenticeship Program is our attempt to do the same for others, to raise up the next generation of pioneering disciple-making leaders for the particular work God has called us to. This calls for the investment of time, prayer and nurturing relationships.

A crucial component of the NAMS Global Apprenticeship Program (GAP) is the 6-monthly gathering of Global Apprentices (GA’s) and selected NAMS leaders on retreat. We do this to make space for prayer, worship, intensive training as well as for fun and fellowship with each other. It is also a time for us to be still[1]. Being on retreat together allows us an opportunity to reflect on what apprentices have been learning through the program.

It was with much joy and expectation that GAs and leaders from Nepal, Thailand and India descended on New Delhi, the capital of India, for a five day retreat from Monday 29 January to Friday 2 February 2018. It turned out to be a wonderful blessed time together. All who attended left challenged, encouraged and prepared for the next six months of the program. Here are a few of the highlights:

Prayer Retreat time

Apprentices were given resources to follow during their personal retreat time. God spoke clearly to the apprentices during this time.

‘I’d never prayed like that before. I will use these resources in my church.’ – One Nepali Global Apprentice


English isn’t the mother tongue of any of our apprentices but they are encouraged to develop their English through GAP as a by-product. During the retreat, each of them led a morning devotion time in English. They all did an excellent job faithfully preaching the Scripture. There has been notable growth in their English proficiency.

Pankaj sharing a devotional
Pankaj sharing devotional


We were blessed to have NAMS Companions Pastor Tek and Pastor Prince, from Nepal and India respectively, to be with us and to teach. Pastor Tek spoke on how discipleship and prayerfully engaging with needs in the local community has been a catalyst for God bringing transformation to the lives of many in Nepal. Pastor Prince taught on principles of effective discipleship and church planting, from his extensive experience of planting more than 300 churches in North India. He also shared some practical insights on avoiding and overcoming hindrances in the ministry God has called us to.

Prince teaching
Pastor Prince Teaching
Pastor Tek teaching
Pastor Tek Teaching


Apprentices spoke about their progress in pioneering new mission work during the past six months. They are engaged in work with children, youth and university students in a multitude of ways. This includes running music workshops, doing sports ministry and leading youth conferences and discussion evenings.

There was space for NAMS leaders to pray, input and help the apprentices develop and nurture the new work they have started. Each apprentice also met with their NAMS Regional Team Leader and the global co-ordinator to discuss what they were learning through the program and how God is developing them.

GA_s sharing progress
Apprentices Sharing Progress
Coaching on how to develop ministry
Coaching How To Develop Ministry
six month evaluation with Kiran
6 Month Evaluation With Kiran




The Global Apprentices and Companions would like to give their heartfelt thanks to all who prayed and supported this event. It was a blessed time together. We are confident in the Lord that there will be much fruit in the coming months and years.

NAMS GAP Delhi 2017
NAMS Gap Delhi 2017

Do you know anybody who may be interested in being a Global Apprentice for 1-2 years at one of our base communities in Bangkok, Nepal, Chile or USA? Visit www.NAMSGAP.com to find out more.

[1] Psalm 46:10


— Isaac Lasky
NAMS Global Apprenticeship Program Co-ordinator

Raising up a new generation (By Isaac Lasky).

When ‘Being With’ Leads to ‘Becoming Like’. (by Peter Matthews)

While in college I was discipled by Pat, a director in our campus ministry. Typically we would meet weekly in the student center for coffee and talk. But for at least half of time, we would do other things together: shopping or I would help him paint his house or I would go on ministry trips with him. In one instance he took me with him while he did street evangelism. He put on me the spot by asking me to share my testimony with a group he was talking to!

In the early days of our discipling relationship, I wondered what was really going on. Why wasn’t Pat taking more time to teach me things? I wanted to go deep and learn, not just hang out!

Then Pat showed me a story from the life of Jesus, from Mark 3:13-19 (ESV):
“And he went up on the mountain and called to him those whom he desired, and they came to him. And he appointed twelve (whom he also named apostles) so that they might be with him and he might send them out to preach and have authority to cast out demons. He appointed the twelve: Simon (to whom he gave the name Peter); James the son of Zebedee and John the brother of James (to whom he gave the name Boanerges, that is, Sons of Thunder); Andrew, and Philip, and Bartholomew, and Matthew, and Thomas, and James the son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus, and Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot, who betrayed him.”

He honed in on verse 14a, “And he appointed twelve (whom he also named apostles) so that they might be with him.” Pat made clear that Jesus wanted the disciples to do and share in Kingdom ministry, but first and foremost, he called them just to be with him. The reason Jesus did this was that he wanted the 12 to watch his life closely and have front row seats as he did Kingdom ministry, so that they too could do the same.

Last week I wrote about the disciple-making principle that ‘more is caught than taught’. Before that principle can be effected however, one has to learn the importance of simply ‘being with’ another who disciples him/her. This has been called the ‘life on life’ principle.

This is where one person intentionally watches and learns from another through the investment and sharing of time and space. The time spent with those we disciple or are being discipled by, creates the space for more to be caught than taught.

While it can be helpful to use disciple making tools and studies (I use them and so did Pat), disciple-makers must remember that the heart of disciple-making is life on life transfer of biblical truths by teaching, practice, modelling and enabling. It requires that I live as a disciple of Jesus and that I both model and multiply that life into the man or woman I am discipling.

To be an effective and fruitful disciple-maker, I have to make space to let people into my life: my home, my errands, my driving, my family, etc. That’s what Jesus did with the 12. That’s what he calls us to do with those we are discipling.


Revd Canon Peter Matthews is a NAMS Companion, and Rector of St Patrick’s Church in Lexington, Kentucky.

When ‘Being With’ Leads to ‘Becoming Like’. (by Peter Matthews)

God’s Results in 2018?

I am persuaded that all those who are used by God to accomplish His will pay attention to the outcome of their effort. They are focused on results. What did God ask me to do?What has come to pass because of my efforts? What is different because of last year’s ministry? Is anything improved because of my contribution? Did the outcome I worked for get achieved or not? Is the community I serve built up by my contribution? Are there any results evident because of my stewardship? Am I focused on the right things?

For those, like me, raised up in the old faithful church, a measure of our faithfulness to Jesus Christ is to be found in the results of our effort to spread the kingdom of God. Indeed the catechism of my youth taught me that I was to “work, pray, and give for the spread of the kingdom of God.” To not do so was to fail in my Christian duty. But what if I worked, prayed, and gave last year, but there was no tangible evidence that the kingdom was spread? What if there were no real results?

You might say to me: “How can we know?” I would have to admit that many of the advances of the kingdom are hidden from our eyes. Only God sees them all. But God uses human beings to accomplish His will. In general, there is no human effort we ever engage in that cannot be measured. If we decide to lose weight this year, we will weigh ourselves regularly, and at the end of the year we will know if our resolve produced results. Results will mean we lost weight. If we set out to learn a new language, the year end will reveal our progress. We have learned to speak it, at least a little. What then are we to look for when we are thinking about the results that advance the kingdom? What are the results God is looking for?

For many years I was complicit in a great deal of organized church activity that did not even ask this question, but no longer. The Lord of the Church interrupted the path of my ministry career, in 1988, by challenging me to the primacy of making disciples. He showed me that there was one absolutely clear evidence of kingdom advance: you will see men and women you have poured your life into, those you have helped become faithful followers of Jesus, pouring their lives into others. You will see them reproducing new faithful followers of Jesus. This is the result that you are praying to see. These are the results that alone give you joy. This is what you are working for. This is the will of God for you.

In the Final Command of the Risen Lord the outcome is declared to be “disciples of all nations.” This is measurable. No vast amount of money in a church budget, no striking new buildings, no attractive new program, no fine preaching, no wonderful youth program, no great worship, no big conference, no wonderful music team, nothing can substitute for what God wants. The only result that matters is another disciple. Are you getting this result from your efforts? Is this not the result God wants?

As we begin this New Year, can we all pray to make this our desire. To want the results that God wants?

— Jon Shuler
NAMS Servant General

God’s Results in 2018?

A Taste of Heaven! NAMS in North and Latin America (By Rev. Manik Corea, NAMS GE).

One of the privileges of my role as Global Executive of NAMS is to visit NAMS Companions around the world. I get to see and hear first hand what God is doing through them; to be part of retreats and meetings with Companions, and to lead and share at NAMS training events (often with other Companions) as we seek to teach and envision our friends, partners and other Christians in the places we have work in, to join in the mission of Jesus to redeem a lost world.

In the last three weeks, I have been first to USA and then to Chile, two of our most representative Mission Regions. It was a joy to see and hear what God is doing in both these continents.

The NAMS USA gathering was at a picturesque Christian centre called The Close near Lexington, Kentucky. From Thursday 30 November to Saturday 2 December, 10 of us (pictured below left), including NAMS Servant General Jon Shuler, gathered for retreat. Companions of NAMS commit to take personal days of retreat every quarter year as part of our Rule of Life, and once a year together as part of our region.

We shared meals, Scriptures and stories, prayed Morning and Evening Prayer together in the ‘Chapel of the Broken Vessel’, had quiet times of reflection, as well as discussed, prayed and planned together for the work God is giving us to pursue in North America.

We all felt encouraged and strengthened afresh to press on with the vision to make disciple-making disciples, raise up disciple-making leaders and plant disciple-making communities. We agreed on new ways to support each other and to become more interconnected and intentional in our work of reaching the lost in the mission field that is North America today.

Soon after, I journeyed to Temuco, Chile, where our NAMS base community there (Comunidad Cristiana ALP) is located.

There, the 30 or so people who make up the community, were busy preparing for the NAMS Latin America meetings from Thursday 7 Dec – Sunday 10 December. We soon swelled up to more than 50 in number, including people from 7 nations, including 9 Cuban pastors and leaders. The presence of the Cubans was a miraculous answer to prayer as it was unheard of in Chile to have such a large group of Cubans be given permission to come.

We met at the SIM Koyamentu Retreat center, in a very scenic location in the countryside. In the course of the few days together, we heard amazing testimonies of God’s work across the Latin continent, prayed for each other, fellowshipped over delicious food and sang lustily in Spanish (which NAMS Regional Team Leader Andres says is the ‘language of heaven.’).

I spoke on the NAMS story and aspects of our church-planting work, including the process of making multiplying disciples and how we pioneer new communities of faith. NAMS Companion Clay Hamrick, who lives in Florida, USA, was ‘skyped-in’ for a session of how to share the Gospel with your neighbors, which was very well received.


At the end of the meetings, three new NAMS base communities were proposed, including one in Cuba. Many of the participants said they finally understood the vision and work of NAMS, while a working partnership between NAMS in Chile and Campus Crusade Chile to reach university students was agreed upon.

One of the highlights of the Latin America meetings was the marriage proposal of NAMS Companion Felipe Casanueva to his girlfriend Cami after one of the afternoon talks, in front of everyone. Thankfully Cami said ‘yes’! We were also serenaded in the evening by music from Kyrios, probably the premier Christian band in Chile.

Returning across the globe to my family in Thailand chalked up more hours in the air than I had ever spent consecutively on a plane. I write this jet-lagged and tired from the journey but I thank God for the wonderful joy it was to see the vision God gave to us in NAMS coming to fruition in the Americas. Thank you for praying and supporting us to do this. To God be the glory!


A Taste of Heaven! NAMS in North and Latin America (By Rev. Manik Corea, NAMS GE).