Urgent call for support

S & N Bangkok

Dear NAMS supporters and friends,

A couple of days ago, we received news about an urgent situation facing a brother who was discipled at our NAMS Base Community in Bangkok called All Nations. S* is a Muslim-background believer from a South-Asia country who was a refugee first in Bangkok. He was subsequently accepted into the US where he is today as a refugee.

This brother has already suffered much for his faith in Christ, not least as he waits for his family to join him. His wife and 3 year old daughter remain in their country of origin awaiting relocation to the States and are in process. In the meantime, they have been facing threats and have been trying to lay low.

However, things came to a head three days ago when a group of gunmen fired upon the house where N was staying. Their daughter who was sleeping at the time, was unhurt, but N was hit by two bullets in the stomach.

We thank God that, though she lost a lot of blood, the wounds did not impact her vital organs and doctors manage to remove the bullets. She is recovering but expected to be in the hospital for some time.

Please will you pray for her recovery, their on-going protection and speedy expediting to the States and safety?

S needs help to fund her treatment and bills from the hospital as well as on-going protection (they will have to move house again) while they await for news from the US embassy.

We are therefore going to establish for the short-term, a ‘N Support Fund’ at NAMS. We estimate we will need $3,000-4,000 to cover medical bills and to support them through these difficult times.

If you would like to contribute to this, you can send a check (USA only) to NAMS at our address on our NAMS web-page (http://www.namsnetwork.com/be-involved.html) or by clicking the link below which will take you to our web-site where you can make payments by card via the internet (from anywhere in the world). Please indicate in both instances (in the comments field, if using the online donation form) that this is for the ‘N Support Fund.’  Even a little will help.



Thank you.
Manik Corea
NAMS Global Executive


*S and N are pseudonyms.

Urgent call for support

More is caught than taught (by Peter Matthews)

Little things can make for big lessons. When I was a teenager, I went riding one day with Troy in his 1968 Barracuda. I noticed a strange looking miniature wallet of sorts by his gear shift. Curious, I held it up and asked Troy, “What is this?” He told me it was his verse pack, which he explained helped him memorize and review Bible verses.

“Are you serious man?” I said. “You actually memorize Bible verses?”  “Yep,” he said. Then he explained to me why a disciple ought to memorize scripture. The next day I went to our local Christian bookstore, bought a verse pack and started memorizing Psalm 15.

That story is a picture of one of the central truths of fruitful disciple making: More is caught than is taught.

That day I learned about memorizing scripture and I started doing it. Why? Not because I went to a class, nor read a book. Not was it because it was the next session of my 12 week discipleship program. I did it because the man who was discipling me did it.

I was with him. I observed him. I imitated him. The result? A practice I started at 18 that still serves me at 53.
The heart of disciple-making is a relationship between a discipler and a disciple. Why? The main way a disciple is trained is through imitation. I often tell people that the Apostle Paul’s disciple-making program is summarized in 1 Corinthians 11:1, “Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ.” That’s the heart of disciple making.

When I was a boy in the late 1960s, there was a popular T.V. commercial that involved a dad and his toddler son. Everything dad did, the son immediately imitated. If dad was painting, son painted. If dad was driving, son pretended to drive. After each instance the narrator repeated the phrase, “Like father, like son.” Finally the dad and son sit down at a tree and dad pulls out a pack of cigarettes, lights one, starts smoking and then sets the pack on the ground between he and the boy. The boy sees the cigarettes and picks them up. As he is doing so the narrator says, “Like father like son, think about it.”

The principle applies to good actions and to bad actions. But no matter what the setting, more is caught than is taught.


Revd Canon Peter Matthews is a NAMS Companion, and Rector of St Patrick’s Church in Lexington, Kentucky.

More is caught than taught (by Peter Matthews)

God’s Results in 2018?

I am persuaded that all those who are used by God to accomplish His will pay attention to the outcome of their effort. They are focused on results. What did God ask me to do?What has come to pass because of my efforts? What is different because of last year’s ministry? Is anything improved because of my contribution? Did the outcome I worked for get achieved or not? Is the community I serve built up by my contribution? Are there any results evident because of my stewardship? Am I focused on the right things?

For those, like me, raised up in the old faithful church, a measure of our faithfulness to Jesus Christ is to be found in the results of our effort to spread the kingdom of God. Indeed the catechism of my youth taught me that I was to “work, pray, and give for the spread of the kingdom of God.” To not do so was to fail in my Christian duty. But what if I worked, prayed, and gave last year, but there was no tangible evidence that the kingdom was spread? What if there were no real results?

You might say to me: “How can we know?” I would have to admit that many of the advances of the kingdom are hidden from our eyes. Only God sees them all. But God uses human beings to accomplish His will. In general, there is no human effort we ever engage in that cannot be measured. If we decide to lose weight this year, we will weigh ourselves regularly, and at the end of the year we will know if our resolve produced results. Results will mean we lost weight. If we set out to learn a new language, the year end will reveal our progress. We have learned to speak it, at least a little. What then are we to look for when we are thinking about the results that advance the kingdom? What are the results God is looking for?

For many years I was complicit in a great deal of organized church activity that did not even ask this question, but no longer. The Lord of the Church interrupted the path of my ministry career, in 1988, by challenging me to the primacy of making disciples. He showed me that there was one absolutely clear evidence of kingdom advance: you will see men and women you have poured your life into, those you have helped become faithful followers of Jesus, pouring their lives into others. You will see them reproducing new faithful followers of Jesus. This is the result that you are praying to see. These are the results that alone give you joy. This is what you are working for. This is the will of God for you.

In the Final Command of the Risen Lord the outcome is declared to be “disciples of all nations.” This is measurable. No vast amount of money in a church budget, no striking new buildings, no attractive new program, no fine preaching, no wonderful youth program, no great worship, no big conference, no wonderful music team, nothing can substitute for what God wants. The only result that matters is another disciple. Are you getting this result from your efforts? Is this not the result God wants?

As we begin this New Year, can we all pray to make this our desire. To want the results that God wants?

— Jon Shuler
NAMS Servant General

God’s Results in 2018?

What on Earth are You Doing? (By Manik Corea)

When Jesus gave his Final Command (Matthew 28:19-20) on a mountain top to eleven tired, partly-doubting deer-in-the-light disciples who were probably pinching themselves at His sight, Jesus enunciated their on-going work as that of ‘making disciples of all nations.’ This was to encompass all peoples and all times and so necessitated becoming the on-going task and focus of the Church called to walk on in the footsteps of those first Apostles.

The book of Acts, the sequel to the Gospel narratives, shows that the graduating class of disciples took Jesus’ final command seriously. They made the being and making of disciples the core concern, activity and thrust of their communal church life. Sure, they needed persecution to get them going on to Judea, Samaria and the ends of the earth (Acts 8:1), but once those disciples of the original few got going, the Church became intentionally missionary for centuries. So much so that all twelve Apostles also left Jerusalem – church tradition has it that they all died outside of Israel.

How far have we come from those halcyon days when the world was turned upside down by missionary disciples of Jesus who shared the Gospel everywhere they went?

Tragically, in many places in the world, the witness of the church is placid, confused, compromised or dead. Cultural Christianity is the lethal order of the day. Sunday Christians whose behavior and desires on a Tuesday afternoon are no different from their un-believing colleagues at the office, or who don’t know and don’t care about their neighbors.

As Francis Chan laments, “(S)omehow many have come to believe that a person can be a “Christian” without being like Christ. A “follower” who doesn’t follow. How does that make any sense?”

Agreeing, the late Dallas Willard wrote: “The greatest issue facing the world today, with all its heartbreaking needs, is whether those who, by profession or culture, are identified as ‘Christians’ will become disciples – students, apprentices, practitioners – of Jesus Christ, steadily learning from him how to live the life of the Kingdom of the Heavens into every corner  of human existence.”

Therefore, in NAMS, a crucial question we ask of people who want to join us is: ‘Are you in a Great Commission Cell?’ (i.e. are you already making disciples or earnestly desiring to do so?). If so, we would love to work with you.

For this, we are certain of, is THE primary business of the Church: to join God in His mission to transform people, their families and communities, one disciple made at a time.

Who will follow you as you follow Christ this year?

What on Earth are You Doing? (By Manik Corea)

Jesus Wept (by Manik Corea)

What drives Jesus to tears? What is he heart-broken over?

There are only two places in the Gospels where we are told Jesus cried.

The first instance was at the tomb of his friend Lazarus. It is the shortest verse in all Scripture – ‘Jesus wept.’ (John 11:35). He cried on seeing the hopeless grief and mournful tears of Mary, Martha and the crowd with them. He was moved by their pain and loss, even though he knew he would shortly wake Lazarus from his death-sleep.

The second recorded time Jesus wept is in Luke 19:41, when, on the approach to Jerusalem and seeing the holy city where he would shortly die, Jesus is overcome with grief.

What so troubled him at the sight of Jerusalem? As he exclaims in the verses that follow, he was deeply distressed by the imminent rejection of the people of the city and all that it represented.

Their Messiah had come and it was the time of their visitation, but they were in no mood to accept him. At their hands, he knew he was about to face a kangaroo court of lies and false accusation, then experience unimaginable pain and shame leading to a slow and tortuous death. They were in effect about to spit, curse and disfigure the faultless face of God.

Jesus wept at these two things – the rejection of God’s people and the grief and finality of the grave.

Sin and death. We know them all too well. Jesus weeps – with us – over them.

Did not Isaiah the prophet foretell that Messiah would be “a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief” (Isaiah 53:3)? Here is no detached deity. He enters fully as Emmanuel into our pain, and his tears are real. He felt the rejection of the people of Israel and he feels ours. “Christ has put on our feelings along with our flesh,” wrote John Calvin[1].

And so he wept.

What about us? What will you weep over in 2018?

How about our frequent failure to obey Jesus’ clear command?

Raineer Chu is a church-planter among the urban poor of the Manila districts in the Philippines. He tells a story that happened in a slum along Manila bay, when a visiting Canadian summer team came to help in the construction of a church building.[2] At dinner, the hard-working Canadian team and their Filipino hosts from the slum churches shared food and stories together.

The Filipino team described one night how, described their lack of resources, they always sought to plant churches in the slums they worked in. They spoke many times of having little or no food but that in the course of their work, several churches had been planted. On hearing their stories, the Canadians wept that they were so poor.

The following night, the Canadian team shared about the wealthy church they were from, and how the church was filled with several hundred members each Sunday. Sadly, they shared, after 17 years, they had yet to plant a single church. On hearing this, the Filipinos wept.

This new year, will you weep over the rejection and lostness of a world without Christ, and our indifference to it?

And will you commit to bringing a smile to Jesus’ face by seeking to obey his unequivocal command to make disciples of the nations and to help start new communities of faith wherever He sends you?

Please pray for us and support us as we seek to do the same.



[1] https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-11.html.1599-1645.

[2] http://raineerchu.com/community/community-mmp-experiment-journeying-community/

Jesus Wept (by Manik Corea)

Come and Join Us In 2018? (By Revd Jon Shuler, NAMS Servant General)

Why wouldn’t you want to join the community of NAMS in 2018? Seriously?

I find myself asking this question after experiencing the most wonderful retreat earlier
this month with eight of our global society who live in North America. We met in the
beauty of holiness at the Christian Retreat Center known as The Close, nestled in the
midst of the Daniel Boone National Forest in the state of Kentucky. Of all that we did,
just being together again as friends and fellow Companions of Jesus was central. We
laughed and sang, we worshipped and wept for joy, we ate and drank, we prayed
together and in silence, we brainstormed and planned for the New Year, but most of all we listened for the “still small voice” of the Lord together. And then we all headed
back to the “place of our assignment” to serve the Lord and his church.

The relational connection that comes to us in this community of gospel servants is a gift from God. So too is the encouragement and support we find as men and women who are obeying the command of the Lord Jesus to “make disciples of all nations.” Also a gift from God is the accountability that it places in our lives, to the Lord and his Word, and to the covenanted life we have promised to pursue together.

I for one would not know how to carry on without this band of brothers and sisters in
Christ that he has given me in the global family of NAMS. We are serving on every
continent. We are a hidden “clan” within the wider church of Jesus, bound together to
“work, pray, and give for the spread of the kingdom of God” in the particular calling of new church planting. It is a wonderful gift to belong to such a religious order.

Would it possibly be true that you who are reading this may be called to join us in some concrete way in 2018? Would you pray about this and seek the Lord for his will in the matter?

How can you join us? There are many ways, but here are five, in ascending order of

1) Join us as regular contributing NAMS Partner. Even a starting gift of $25 per
month will help the gospel go to the nations. Go to ‘www.namsnetwork.com/be-involved.html’ to begin doing so.

2) Become a dedicated praying NAMS Intercessor. Set you phone to remind you
to pray for us at 10:02 am each day. Ask the Lord of the Harvest to raise up laborers to go into the harvest, as Jesus commanded in Luke 10:2.
Contact Mary Garrison at ‘mary.garrison@namsnetwork.com’, our NAMS Global Prayer/Intercessor Co-ordinator, to become a prayer partner with us

3) Become a NAMS Centurion. Be one of the men and women who are taking up
the call to help spread the gospel right where you live, in covenanted partnership with
NAMS. Sign up to be a NAMS Centurion. Go to ‘www.NAMScenturion.com’.

4) Volunteer to be a NAMS Global Apprentice. Give a year or two to the Lord to
serve in the mission field of his choosing for you. In North America, Nepal, or Norway. Wherever he needs you. Go to ‘www.namsgap.com’ for more information.

5) Decide to become a NAMS Companion. Begin the journey of discovery that
leads to a life under rule in our global missionary society. Write to us today at

Will you join us this coming year?

— Jon Shuler

Servant General (NAMS)

Come and Join Us In 2018? (By Revd Jon Shuler, NAMS Servant General)