A handful of rice (by NAMS Global Executive Manik Corea)

The Friends Missionary Prayer Band (FMPB) is an indigenous missionary society in India. Today, it has more than 1,500 missionaries working throughout India. But their beginnings were small and almost insignificant – starting from a small prayer group of university students in the late 1960s in the South of India.

At a Faith2Share Leadership Consultation* in Ethiopia in 2014, we heard the leader of FMPB tell of the early days in their missionary endeavor. Women from their supporting churches decided to pray and to give towards the work of the fledgling group of missionaries. But they did not have money to give.

Each day however, as they cooked their staple diet of rice for their families, they would set aside one cup of rice in a separate cloth – it was ‘for the missionaries.’ Once a week, all the ladies would pool together and collect the rice they had set aside in their cloth packs and then distribute it to the missionaries as part of their support.

This is a wonderful illustration of the principle of intentional, regular investment of our resources into kingdom work that is purposeful – what Paul referred to as a ‘partnership in the Gospel’ (Philippians 1:5). Paul and his team were being helped by the Christians in Philippi to there to take the Gospel to the surrounding nations. Who are you partnering with for the Gospel to go to the nations?

NAMS is growing. We currently have NAMS Companions in at least 13 countries on 5 continents, and doors are opening up at present in at least another 6 or so countries, with more on the horizon. We need desperately to fund our NAMS Base Communities (i.e. at least two or three NAMS Companions on mission in one location) and Global Apprentices in our GAP program (www.namsgap.com), some in places where resources are scarce.

Our primary work is in these NAMS Base Communities (NBC) is to make disciples who make disciples, raise leaders who make disciples and plant disciple-making churches. The contexts we work in are varied and different.

For example, in December later this year, two of our Latin American leaders will lead a team to the impoverished nation of Cuba where a small community of believers led by a couple trained at our NBC in Chile, have begun meeting in the capital and a group of pastors from another city have asked us to work to have a NAMS base there.

Last week, two of our NAMS Companion leaders in India and their wives have just led training for about 40 women from the State of Orissa in how to be disciple-making leaders. The women have set themselves the goal of making one other disciple of Jesus each in the next year.

We are working in partnership with the Anglican Church in Mandalay, Myanmar, to establish a NAMS base that will help them plant churches among their many unreached people-groups. A Covenant of Partnership is being drawn up.

We are working with the Presbyterian (uniting) Church of Christ in Thailand to reach university students at their main Student Center in Bangkok.

We are also working with Christians and churches to make disciples and plant churches in Nepal, India, Kenya, Egypt, DRC, USA and the UK, among other nations.

We are looking for people ready to give us a ‘handful of rice’ set aside for global mission and to support us in the work God has called us to.

Will you pray for us? Will you give towards our projects – which we would love to give you more details about ? Or give a one-off gift? Will you partner with us for the Gospel? If so, click below to ‘Donate’

Write to us at info@namsnetwork.com to ask to join our global intercessors group or to learn more about our work.

* Faith2Share is a network of global mission agencies and mission movements collaborating together for discipleship and mission, that NAMS is a member of. http://www.faith2share.net

 

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A handful of rice (by NAMS Global Executive Manik Corea)

Discipleship is a process….Not a program (By Prince Thomas).

We have been given a clear mandate – to make disciples (Matt 28:19). The original mission of the church is to make disciples of Jesus by creating intimate, relational environments of multiplication and transformation. Churches and missions who are focused on discipleship grow and multiply quickly. Discipleship is the process by which we maximize the potential of our people and equip them for reaching their communities and the Nations.

Ravi Kumar, a young man from the North Indian state of Punjab heard me preaching in the streets about Jesus 4 years ago. He approached me after the meeting with several questions – it was an opportunity for me to share with him and to clear his doubts. Soon, Ravi accepted the Lord and I started a ‘new believers training program’ for him. Later as he grew in faith, he began to spend a week with me every month. It was an excellent opportunity not only to teach him but to take him along with me whenever I went in various mission fields to preach and teach. I gave him opportunities to share his testimony, preach and pray for the sick. He was so excited to go through the journey of discipleship and decided to go back to his own state and start a ministry there. He started the ministry one year before in Punjab which is the birth place of the Sikh religion.

It was not easy as the opposition in his region was so severe. His own family members hated him and opposed him as he preached about Jesus. He applied some of the teachings I taught him like surveying the village, prayer walking, finding the person of peace, initiating new believers training and discipleship programs etc.

Slowly he began to see the results. He just followed the simple teachings we gave him and he began to see souls saved as well as villages open up for the gospel. Some very influential people joined his church recently. There is now a wider path opening up in this state. I am still discipling Ravi and we spent time together regularly. And as I do with him, Ravi is also regularly discipling his own people in the same way.

Prince & Ravi ministering togetherBelievers in Punjab

I have been in the full time ministry for almost 23 years now. At the beginning of my ministry, I thought discipleship was always a program. But I realized later that discipleship was actually a process. It begins in relationship, it continues with intentionality and finally results in transformation as disciples start to reach others. This is a key part of our calling as NAMS Companions. May the Lord continue to help us to be disciples who make disciples.

— Prince Thomas is a NAMS Companion serving in Haryana, North India.
He has been involved in starting and leading an a vibrant church-planting movement there for the last 20 years. He is originally from Kerala, South India.

 

Discipleship is a process….Not a program (By Prince Thomas).

Stranger on the bus – Interview with NAMS Regional Team Leader Pranab Kishor Kumar.

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One day in 1992 as Pranab was traveling on a bus to his college in India, he began a conversation with a stranger. Pranab felt prompted to ask him if he knew about Jesus. The man replied that he had never heard the name of Jesus. This was a life-changing moment for Pranab, as he realised then that there were many people in India like that man on the bus. That was also the moment God began to stir in Pranab’s heart that he was to give his life to trying to reach and make disciples of people in his home state of Orissa and beyond. In a few years time, Pranab crossed paths with NAMS, and has been a part of leading our work in India since. We find out more about him in this interview.

  1. Tell us a little about your background and family. How did you become a follower of Jesus?

I am the eldest son in my family. I am married to Malarani Kumar and we have a son John Daniel Rajkumar. We live in a village in the Balagir District of Orissa, India.

I grew up in a Christian family that faithfully attended church, prayed and read the Bible. As a teenager, I attended an Evangelical Union camp in Balangir and decided to becoming a follower of Jesus. From that day, I began to witness for Christ in and around my village and joined the local Bhorpada congregation of the Church of North India (CNI).

In September 1997, I was moved to begin New Life For India, an organisation committed to send missionaries to plant churches in the unreached villages and districts in the State of Orissa and beyond.

  1. How did you come to be involved with NAMS?

I first met Revd Manik Corea (now NAMS Global Executive) at a Faith2Share Leadership Consultation in 2013. In August 2015, he invited me to come to Bangkok for a NAMS Regional Asia Leaders meeting, and I heard Revd Dr Jon Shuler, NAMS Servant General, share about the vision and call of NAMS. His teaching and life impressed me much. Their training added fuel to my desire to want to be and make disciples who made other disciples. We had been trying to live this since 2005 but not is as organised a way. So I decided then that God was calling me to be a part of this missionary order. Since then Manik has visited me in Orissa with NAMS teams a number of times. In 2017, I was appointed Regional Team Leader for South Asia.

  1. How have you been challenged and grown since becoming a NAMS Companion?

It has been quite a journey. Through my interactions with NAMS leaders, I have learned that making disciples is the seed of planting healthy, multiplying churches and of reaching communities for Christ. It is Jesus’ final command (Matthew 28:18-20, Acts 1:8). I have started to teach and train the same things of my co-workers.

Being a Companion means I have to make a determined plan for a disciplined daily life of reading the Scriptures, seeking to obey Him, praying and giving for global mission. I am reminded also through the 10.02 call to pray for labourers regularly for the regions of the world. It is not easy but I am growing. I have begun to take a retreat every quarter of the year a priority for me and my wife as Companions.

  1. What is your vision as a NAMS Regional Team Leader for South Asia region that you lead?

We currently have two NAMS Companion couples working in India – ourselves in Orissa, and in the North of India (Prince Matthew). I am praying that doors will open in other countries in the region, for example Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. I visited Sri Lanka in 2017 and found that many church leaders were asking for help to learn how to make disciples and start churches. God has also given me a heart for Bangladesh. We need to find partners and contacts in these places, some of who will become Companions to help us plant Base Communities in those countries.

Additionally, I would like to increase the number of Companions in India. I am currently working with two leaders who are very interested. We also need to reach and raise Companion leaders among the ladies. (We will be having a Woman Leaders Seminar in September this year).

  1. Finally, NAMS Companions are called to 3 things in particular – make disciple-making disciples, raise disciple-making leaders and plant disciple-making churches. How are you doing this?

I am meeting regularly with and discipling 4 men who are themselves making disciples. We already have new disciple-making cells in 4 places as well.

In addition, I am walking purposefully with 2 other disciple-making leaders. Please pray for us.

 

Pranab and the NAMS South Asia Region need your prayer and partnership. If you would like to give specifically towards our work in the NAMS South Asia region, please write to us at infor@namsnetwork.com or click the ‘DONATE’ button below to seed funds.

 

Stranger on the bus – Interview with NAMS Regional Team Leader Pranab Kishor Kumar.

No Equal

In Jesus’ name, we have authority over the devil and all his forces. My family story is a testimony of this!

Pankaj

Almost 26 years ago now, a team from Campus Crusade came to share the gospel in Ammerbasti village of Kanchanpur, Nepal – my home village. One day my father went to watch the Jesus film. He was moved by it, and spoke to the team members. They shared the Gospel with him. After that, he began to attend a church in another village. Those were difficult days to become a Christian, as we were in a Hindu village. Soon, a rumor started spreading that my father was now a Christian. He was now facing persecution – and when the situation worsened, my father fled to India, leaving behind his pregnant wife (my mother), who was not a believer at that time.

A few months later, I was born. A week after my birth, our house was tragically burnt up in a fire. Our relatives and other villages blamed my father was causing the fire because the gods and evil spirits (the chief spirit of which was called Vir) were angry and had cursed our family.

Life became very difficult for my mother. Eventually, my father secretly returned to our village and took us away to live with him in Punjab, India. There, a Christian man from Kerala called Dr. Thomas who was studying there, started discipling my father. My father began to gather with other people to read the Scriptures and prayer. Sometime later, my mother also became a believer and was baptized.

Five years later, because the situation was improving back in Nepal , we moved back to our original village. We shared a house with my extended family – my grandfather and uncles. It was a two-story house and my family lived on the upper level of the house. My grandfather and uncles continued to worship the spirits. In fact, my grandfather could call on the spirits through black magic.

However, he realized that after my family moved back, he could not summon the spirits anymore. He asked my father if he did anything to the Vir (or chief spirit). My father told him that because of God’s Spirit in them, no other spirit could bother them. He told my grandfather that the Holy Spirit is the God of the universe.

The next day, my grandfather confessed that he tried to call on the Vir to return to their house but it was to no avail. He realized that the Holy Spirit must be stronger than the Vir, so they should follow and worship Him. At that point, my father gave him a New Testament.

My grandfather began to read. He read in Mark’s Gospel (11:12-25) where Jesus cursed a fig tree. He told my father that if your God is the real God, then let him also dry the big tree that was in front of their house. As we prayed, God did a great miracle and within a month, the tree in front of our house had dried up and died.

As a result my grandparents, uncles and all their families believed in the Lord Jesus Christ and were baptized. Our Lord Jesus has no equal, as my family have come to learn. All glory to God.

Today, Pankaj pastors a church in Kathmandu, Nepal and is a NAMS Global Apprentice with 2 others young adults. God is using them to bring the Gospel and making disciples in Nepal in a new generation. Will you support our GAP program by praying for us and giving towards the support and raising up of new Global Apprentices like Pankaj?

Donate Now!

No Equal

Help us bring a new NAMS Global Apprentice from India to Bangkok, Thailand

Help us bring a new NAMS Global Apprentice from India to Bangkok, Thailand

The NAMS Global Apprenticeship Program (GAP) exists to raise up the next generation of disciple-making leaders. Global apprentices live on site, train and grow in faith, experience and knowledge within the stimulating environments of one of our NAMS base communities.

John Gansalves is a young leader in India that we have identified would greatly benefit from being part of this program. God is calling him to serve at our base community in Bangkok, Thailand for a one year period. During his time with us, John will gain experience in cross cultural mission and ministry, be trained and equipped to be a disciple-making leader and serve the base community here through his many gifts and talents and the experience he brings of children and youth ministry in India.

During his exploratory trip to Bangkok in August 2017 it became very clear how the Lord could use John in the unique context we have to evangelise and disciple students, migrants and refugees.

Please pray for John and NAMS GAP as we seek to raise the $12,000 required for him to be a Global Apprentice in Bangkok, Thailand for the next twelve months.

If you would like to give towards his support, please go to the link below.

DONATE NOW!

Help us bring a new NAMS Global Apprentice from India to Bangkok, Thailand

NAMS Blog – Stealing away with Jesus

To be much for God, we must be much with God…Quit playing, start praying. Quit feasting, start fasting. Talk less with men, talk more with God. Listen less to men, listen to the words of God. Skip travel, start travail.” (Leonard Ravenhill)

How often and regularly do you pray alone with God and with others?

Jesus not only taught the necessity of having a private prayer space with our Father God (Matthew 6:6), but he made private prayer times a noticeable practice of his ministry and of his life with his disciples (Luke 5:16; Luke 6:12; Matthew 14:23; Luke 9:18; Luke 11:1).

Not only that, but Jesus sought also to retreat from ministry and the crowds occasionally to have time to rest and no doubt, pray and be still in company with His Father. There are a few examples in the Gospels of Jesus doing this with His disciples (see for example Matthew 14:13, Mark 3:7 and especially Mark 6:31-32).

In the NAMS Rule of Life (http://www.namsnetwork.com/assets/namsrule.pdf) all Companions commit to taking 3 personal retreats with God and, once a year, to retreat, if possible, with other Companions in their nation or region.

Recently at our annual NAMS Asia Regional Retreat in Delhi, India, we began our time of prayerful retreat by reading about the magnificent start to Jesus’ ministry as recorded in Mark 1:32-39.

On the back of a wonderful day of miraculous healings and deliverances that multitudes saw and experienced – the effect was city-wide (vs 33) – Jesus went ‘MIA’ the very next day!

We read in verse 35 that He stole Himself away to a desolate place to pray.

Note that this was right in the midst of ministry, at the very onset of His life’s work.

This led to a frantic search by the disciples for Him. Miracle workers are always in demand and Peter told Jesus that all the people were looking for Him.

But Jesus already had a different plan and priority, perhaps out of His time of prayer with His Father that morning. Jesus announced, no doubt to some bewilderment and the consternation of his disciples, that He (with the disciples) was heading to other towns to preach, since this was why He came. And so it came to pass (see vs 39).

Popularity with the crowds meant little to Jesus and was never allowed to be the measure of His success. Taking the message of His Gospel all across Israel was.

He was never driven simply by the needs of those around Him, but was always led by the vision and mission His Father gave to Him. His agenda and message were the result of watching and hearing from His Father – John 5:19; 12:49-50. His times of regular prayer and occasional retreat kept Him a-tuned to His Father’s will.

In Delhi, we sought to follow our Master’s example. We deliberately made time and space to be quiet before the Lord, to listen and tune ourselves afresh to our God in silence and solitude. We also had times of communal prayer and worship and biblical reflection. We were reminded how important it was to seek God’s face and to be attentive to His voice.

It was a blessed time as we heard from the Lord about our personal and communal calling as NAMS missionary disciples and leaders.

This season of Lent, will you, like Jesus and us, seek to make regular prayer and occasional retreat with God a vital part of your walk as disciples of Jesus?

NAMS Blog – Stealing away with Jesus

Raising up a new generation (By Isaac Lasky).

‘The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The next best time is now.’ So goes an old Chinese proverb.

Indeed, we were all once saplings that were cared for and invested in by godly people who by God’s grace helped us to become trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord (Isaiah 61:3). The NAMS Global Apprenticeship Program is our attempt to do the same for others, to raise up the next generation of pioneering disciple-making leaders for the particular work God has called us to. This calls for the investment of time, prayer and nurturing relationships.

A crucial component of the NAMS Global Apprenticeship Program (GAP) is the 6-monthly gathering of Global Apprentices (GA’s) and selected NAMS leaders on retreat. We do this to make space for prayer, worship, intensive training as well as for fun and fellowship with each other. It is also a time for us to be still[1]. Being on retreat together allows us an opportunity to reflect on what apprentices have been learning through the program.

It was with much joy and expectation that GAs and leaders from Nepal, Thailand and India descended on New Delhi, the capital of India, for a five day retreat from Monday 29 January to Friday 2 February 2018. It turned out to be a wonderful blessed time together. All who attended left challenged, encouraged and prepared for the next six months of the program. Here are a few of the highlights:

Prayer Retreat time

Apprentices were given resources to follow during their personal retreat time. God spoke clearly to the apprentices during this time.

‘I’d never prayed like that before. I will use these resources in my church.’ – One Nepali Global Apprentice

Preaching

English isn’t the mother tongue of any of our apprentices but they are encouraged to develop their English through GAP as a by-product. During the retreat, each of them led a morning devotion time in English. They all did an excellent job faithfully preaching the Scripture. There has been notable growth in their English proficiency.

Pankaj sharing a devotional
Pankaj sharing devotional

Training

We were blessed to have NAMS Companions Pastor Tek and Pastor Prince, from Nepal and India respectively, to be with us and to teach. Pastor Tek spoke on how discipleship and prayerfully engaging with needs in the local community has been a catalyst for God bringing transformation to the lives of many in Nepal. Pastor Prince taught on principles of effective discipleship and church planting, from his extensive experience of planting more than 300 churches in North India. He also shared some practical insights on avoiding and overcoming hindrances in the ministry God has called us to.

Prince teaching
Pastor Prince Teaching
Pastor Tek teaching
Pastor Tek Teaching

Review

Apprentices spoke about their progress in pioneering new mission work during the past six months. They are engaged in work with children, youth and university students in a multitude of ways. This includes running music workshops, doing sports ministry and leading youth conferences and discussion evenings.

There was space for NAMS leaders to pray, input and help the apprentices develop and nurture the new work they have started. Each apprentice also met with their NAMS Regional Team Leader and the global co-ordinator to discuss what they were learning through the program and how God is developing them.

GA_s sharing progress
Apprentices Sharing Progress
Coaching on how to develop ministry
Coaching How To Develop Ministry
six month evaluation with Kiran
6 Month Evaluation With Kiran

 

 

 

The Global Apprentices and Companions would like to give their heartfelt thanks to all who prayed and supported this event. It was a blessed time together. We are confident in the Lord that there will be much fruit in the coming months and years.

NAMS GAP Delhi 2017
NAMS Gap Delhi 2017

Do you know anybody who may be interested in being a Global Apprentice for 1-2 years at one of our base communities in Bangkok, Nepal, Chile or USA? Visit www.NAMSGAP.com to find out more.

[1] Psalm 46:10

 

— Isaac Lasky
NAMS Global Apprenticeship Program Co-ordinator

Raising up a new generation (By Isaac Lasky).