NAMS Blog – Sold out for Jesus (by Manik Corea)

Recently, when teaching in our NAMS Latin America meetings, I shared a cogent definition of discipleship by the late Dallas Willard:

“A disciple is a person who has decided that the most important thing in their life is to learn how to do what Jesus said to do.” [1]

The late, great Christian singer Keith Green likewise gave a simple and memorable description of a genuine Christian: ‘One who is bananas for Jesus’.

Both definitions were true to Jesus’ words (Luke 6:46, 14:25-33, Matthew 28:20).

The highest place in our lives must belong to Jesus. This means He gets the first and final call over what we do with our money, time, possession and energies and over every life critical issue, opportunity, relationship and circumstance that is ours.

He demands that all our dreams and ambitions be laid at His feet in total surrender. The call to discipleship is not, and has never been, a popular message. Sinners after all prefer their way to God’s, and sin is essentially civil war against the rule and reign of God over us.

What is truly heart-breaking, though, is how very few of us who call ourselves Christians are likewise willing to accede full control to Jesus in the same way. We want Him to save us from hell in the next world, but to pander and be subservient to our wants and desires in this. If you’re like me, we easily hold back the more precious parts of our lives from Him.

But we cannot have it both ways. Jesus didn’t come so the ‘faithful’ could simply be comfortable and fed.

There are so very many people – some live across your street, others across the oceans – that remain ignorant, apathetic or simply have no access to the message of God’s love and salvation in Christ Jesus.[ii]

John Wesley famously said, ‘the world is my parish.’ Today, for most faithful Christians, the parish has become their world.

Despite ostentatious talk about missions, many evangelical churches spend more money, time and effort on their own buildings, staff, programs and services to meet the needs of their members or attendees than they do on reaching the unreached, making disciples or helping to plant new mission-centered churches. Global mission is hardly a concern for the average Christian in most parts of the globe.

This is borne out by damning statistics like the following:

A meager 0.1% of the estimated US$53 trillion that Christians the world over will earn this year will be given towards Christian mission.[iii]

Christians make up 33% of the world’s population, receive 53% of the world’s annual income but spend 98% of it on themselves.[iv]

It is patently clear to us in NAMS that God has called us to play our part in awakening His sleeping Church to obedience to Jesus’ final command to make disciples of all nations.

To do that, we must ourselves be sold out to Jesus. There can be no compromise.

My prayer and passionate hope as Global Executive of NAMS is that every NAMS Companion will be a bona-fide all-out, disciple-making, Spirit-filled, Jesus-pleasing Word-abiding, rabid seeker of the lost, like our Master. And that we would find and raise others to be the same.

It is enough, as Jesus said, for the disciple to become like his master. (Matthew 10:25).

Will you pray, support and join us in this glorious, all-or-nothing endeavor?


[1] Dallas Willard, ‘Rethinking Evangelism’, Cutting Edge Magazine, Vol 5, No. 1 (Winter 2001)

[ii] Globally, it is estimated that a staggering 80% of all non-Christians (i.e. majority of which are Buddhists, Hindus and Muslims) in our world do not personally know another Christian. – see section on ‘Personal Contact’ for how this figure was derived.

[iii] based on

[iv] David Barret and Todd Johnson, World Christian Trends AD 30- AD 2200, (William Carey Library:Pasadena, 2001), 656.





NAMS Blog – Sold out for Jesus (by Manik Corea)

NAMS Blog – Stealing away with Jesus

To be much for God, we must be much with God…Quit playing, start praying. Quit feasting, start fasting. Talk less with men, talk more with God. Listen less to men, listen to the words of God. Skip travel, start travail.” (Leonard Ravenhill)

How often and regularly do you pray alone with God and with others?

Jesus not only taught the necessity of having a private prayer space with our Father God (Matthew 6:6), but he made private prayer times a noticeable practice of his ministry and of his life with his disciples (Luke 5:16; Luke 6:12; Matthew 14:23; Luke 9:18; Luke 11:1).

Not only that, but Jesus sought also to retreat from ministry and the crowds occasionally to have time to rest and no doubt, pray and be still in company with His Father. There are a few examples in the Gospels of Jesus doing this with His disciples (see for example Matthew 14:13, Mark 3:7 and especially Mark 6:31-32).

In the NAMS Rule of Life ( all Companions commit to taking 3 personal retreats with God and, once a year, to retreat, if possible, with other Companions in their nation or region.

Recently at our annual NAMS Asia Regional Retreat in Delhi, India, we began our time of prayerful retreat by reading about the magnificent start to Jesus’ ministry as recorded in Mark 1:32-39.

On the back of a wonderful day of miraculous healings and deliverances that multitudes saw and experienced – the effect was city-wide (vs 33) – Jesus went ‘MIA’ the very next day!

We read in verse 35 that He stole Himself away to a desolate place to pray.

Note that this was right in the midst of ministry, at the very onset of His life’s work.

This led to a frantic search by the disciples for Him. Miracle workers are always in demand and Peter told Jesus that all the people were looking for Him.

But Jesus already had a different plan and priority, perhaps out of His time of prayer with His Father that morning. Jesus announced, no doubt to some bewilderment and the consternation of his disciples, that He (with the disciples) was heading to other towns to preach, since this was why He came. And so it came to pass (see vs 39).

Popularity with the crowds meant little to Jesus and was never allowed to be the measure of His success. Taking the message of His Gospel all across Israel was.

He was never driven simply by the needs of those around Him, but was always led by the vision and mission His Father gave to Him. His agenda and message were the result of watching and hearing from His Father – John 5:19; 12:49-50. His times of regular prayer and occasional retreat kept Him a-tuned to His Father’s will.

In Delhi, we sought to follow our Master’s example. We deliberately made time and space to be quiet before the Lord, to listen and tune ourselves afresh to our God in silence and solitude. We also had times of communal prayer and worship and biblical reflection. We were reminded how important it was to seek God’s face and to be attentive to His voice.

It was a blessed time as we heard from the Lord about our personal and communal calling as NAMS missionary disciples and leaders.

This season of Lent, will you, like Jesus and us, seek to make regular prayer and occasional retreat with God a vital part of your walk as disciples of Jesus?

NAMS Blog – Stealing away with Jesus

Provision Through Prayer (by Mary Garrison Ruiz)

In late July of 2016, I found myself sleeping on the floor of the airport in Madrid – uncertain of where to go and clearly not knowing what to do. Let me explain…

My husband Ivan and I were on a 6 month missionary journey with NAMS. We had spent a number of weeks in Spain attending meetings and then began moving through the southern part of the country looking for open doors to establish future ministry relationships. But just as we were preparing to move on to our presumably well-planned next destination in Africa, where we would spend 1-2 months, the door was quickly and unexpectedly shut. What were we to do? Go home? That’s certainly what my mind jumped to, but still there remained an unrest in our hearts… The Lord had called us to step out in faith; turning back didn’t seem the right response. We decided to pray and wait upon the Lord to answer, and in a word, he did: Cairo.

“But what will we do there?” I argued. “We haven’t made any plans for where to stay, who to meet with, or places to serve. We won’t have anything to do in Cairo.” Honest to goodness, with tears in his eyes, Ivan simply said: “We will be there, and we’ll pray.” Uff. I was speechless. I confess that while I could articulate the importance and power of prayer, I was so very weak in practice. It seemed somehow not enough to devote our time to prayer; I had another form of service in mind, with prayer a supplement, not the focus. But I couldn’t argue; Scripture is clear on the indisputable centrality of prayer in the Christian life, and in time it was also clear how much I needed to mature in that area.

So to Cairo we went, and we devoted ourselves to prayer in the morning and at night. During the day, we kept our eyes open and watched to see how God would answer. And answer he did. Within just a matter of weeks, God, in his Providence, provided more abundantly than we could have asked for or imagined. Among the beautiful fruit of that time of prayer and ministry in Cairo was the start of a new relationship with a dear brother and friend who soon became NAMS’s first Companion in Egypt.

I mention this story as a personal testimony of the power of prayer and its centrality to the pioneering ministry of NAMS. The leadership at NAMS have even come up with a practice that has been adopted by our Friends and Companions around the world. Everyday at 10:02 AM, no matter the time zone, we remember Jesus’ instructions to his disciples in Luke 10:2 to pray to God, the Lord of the Harvest, to raise up new laborers for ministry. Our Egyptian Companion is an answer to that prayer, but we believe there are more laborers to come.

Would you join our team of global intercessors in praying at 10:02 each day for the ministry of NAMS? If you would, we’d love to send you updates about NAMS ministries around the world and testimonies of answered prayers. To do so, just write to me, Mary Garrison Ruiz, at, and I’ll add you to the prayer team email list. Once a month, I send out a prayer calendar to help you know how you can pray for specific regions around the world, and I also occasionally send out information in the case of urgent prayer needs. Come join us at 10:02. You are truly welcome and needed.

Provision Through Prayer (by Mary Garrison Ruiz)

Urgent call for support

S & N Bangkok

Dear NAMS supporters and friends,

A couple of days ago, we received news about an urgent situation facing a brother who was discipled at our NAMS Base Community in Bangkok called All Nations. S* is a Muslim-background believer from a South-Asia country who was a refugee first in Bangkok. He was subsequently accepted into the US where he is today as a refugee.

This brother has already suffered much for his faith in Christ, not least as he waits for his family to join him. His wife and 3 year old daughter remain in their country of origin awaiting relocation to the States and are in process. In the meantime, they have been facing threats and have been trying to lay low.

However, things came to a head three days ago when a group of gunmen fired upon the house where N was staying. Their daughter who was sleeping at the time, was unhurt, but N was hit by two bullets in the stomach.

We thank God that, though she lost a lot of blood, the wounds did not impact her vital organs and doctors manage to remove the bullets. She is recovering but expected to be in the hospital for some time.

Please will you pray for her recovery, their on-going protection and speedy expediting to the States and safety?

S needs help to fund her treatment and bills from the hospital as well as on-going protection (they will have to move house again) while they await for news from the US embassy.

We are therefore going to establish for the short-term, a ‘N Support Fund’ at NAMS. We estimate we will need $3,000-4,000 to cover medical bills and to support them through these difficult times.

If you would like to contribute to this, you can send a check (USA only) to NAMS at our address on our NAMS web-page ( or by clicking the link below which will take you to our web-site where you can make payments by card via the internet (from anywhere in the world). Please indicate in both instances (in the comments field, if using the online donation form) that this is for the ‘N Support Fund.’  Even a little will help.



Thank you.
Manik Corea
NAMS Global Executive


*S and N are pseudonyms.

Urgent call for support

What on Earth are You Doing? (By Manik Corea)

When Jesus gave his Final Command (Matthew 28:19-20) on a mountain top to eleven tired, partly-doubting deer-in-the-light disciples who were probably pinching themselves at His sight, Jesus enunciated their on-going work as that of ‘making disciples of all nations.’ This was to encompass all peoples and all times and so necessitated becoming the on-going task and focus of the Church called to walk on in the footsteps of those first Apostles.

The book of Acts, the sequel to the Gospel narratives, shows that the graduating class of disciples took Jesus’ final command seriously. They made the being and making of disciples the core concern, activity and thrust of their communal church life. Sure, they needed persecution to get them going on to Judea, Samaria and the ends of the earth (Acts 8:1), but once those disciples of the original few got going, the Church became intentionally missionary for centuries. So much so that all twelve Apostles also left Jerusalem – church tradition has it that they all died outside of Israel.

How far have we come from those halcyon days when the world was turned upside down by missionary disciples of Jesus who shared the Gospel everywhere they went?

Tragically, in many places in the world, the witness of the church is placid, confused, compromised or dead. Cultural Christianity is the lethal order of the day. Sunday Christians whose behavior and desires on a Tuesday afternoon are no different from their un-believing colleagues at the office, or who don’t know and don’t care about their neighbors.

As Francis Chan laments, “(S)omehow many have come to believe that a person can be a “Christian” without being like Christ. A “follower” who doesn’t follow. How does that make any sense?”

Agreeing, the late Dallas Willard wrote: “The greatest issue facing the world today, with all its heartbreaking needs, is whether those who, by profession or culture, are identified as ‘Christians’ will become disciples – students, apprentices, practitioners – of Jesus Christ, steadily learning from him how to live the life of the Kingdom of the Heavens into every corner  of human existence.”

Therefore, in NAMS, a crucial question we ask of people who want to join us is: ‘Are you in a Great Commission Cell?’ (i.e. are you already making disciples or earnestly desiring to do so?). If so, we would love to work with you.

For this, we are certain of, is THE primary business of the Church: to join God in His mission to transform people, their families and communities, one disciple made at a time.

Who will follow you as you follow Christ this year?

What on Earth are You Doing? (By Manik Corea)

Jesus Wept (by Manik Corea)

What drives Jesus to tears? What is he heart-broken over?

There are only two places in the Gospels where we are told Jesus cried.

The first instance was at the tomb of his friend Lazarus. It is the shortest verse in all Scripture – ‘Jesus wept.’ (John 11:35). He cried on seeing the hopeless grief and mournful tears of Mary, Martha and the crowd with them. He was moved by their pain and loss, even though he knew he would shortly wake Lazarus from his death-sleep.

The second recorded time Jesus wept is in Luke 19:41, when, on the approach to Jerusalem and seeing the holy city where he would shortly die, Jesus is overcome with grief.

What so troubled him at the sight of Jerusalem? As he exclaims in the verses that follow, he was deeply distressed by the imminent rejection of the people of the city and all that it represented.

Their Messiah had come and it was the time of their visitation, but they were in no mood to accept him. At their hands, he knew he was about to face a kangaroo court of lies and false accusation, then experience unimaginable pain and shame leading to a slow and tortuous death. They were in effect about to spit, curse and disfigure the faultless face of God.

Jesus wept at these two things – the rejection of God’s people and the grief and finality of the grave.

Sin and death. We know them all too well. Jesus weeps – with us – over them.

Did not Isaiah the prophet foretell that Messiah would be “a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief” (Isaiah 53:3)? Here is no detached deity. He enters fully as Emmanuel into our pain, and his tears are real. He felt the rejection of the people of Israel and he feels ours. “Christ has put on our feelings along with our flesh,” wrote John Calvin[1].

And so he wept.

What about us? What will you weep over in 2018?

How about our frequent failure to obey Jesus’ clear command?

Raineer Chu is a church-planter among the urban poor of the Manila districts in the Philippines. He tells a story that happened in a slum along Manila bay, when a visiting Canadian summer team came to help in the construction of a church building.[2] At dinner, the hard-working Canadian team and their Filipino hosts from the slum churches shared food and stories together.

The Filipino team described one night how, described their lack of resources, they always sought to plant churches in the slums they worked in. They spoke many times of having little or no food but that in the course of their work, several churches had been planted. On hearing their stories, the Canadians wept that they were so poor.

The following night, the Canadian team shared about the wealthy church they were from, and how the church was filled with several hundred members each Sunday. Sadly, they shared, after 17 years, they had yet to plant a single church. On hearing this, the Filipinos wept.

This new year, will you weep over the rejection and lostness of a world without Christ, and our indifference to it?

And will you commit to bringing a smile to Jesus’ face by seeking to obey his unequivocal command to make disciples of the nations and to help start new communities of faith wherever He sends you?

Please pray for us and support us as we seek to do the same.





Jesus Wept (by Manik Corea)

The New You. (By Manik Corea)

Discipleship is a life-long process of being renewed and restored into the image of Jesus Christ, the true image of the invisible God.

Christianity is not a religion of human reformation but of divine transformation. God is seeking a new breed of men and women who are wholly changed by Him. Jesus startled the Pharisee Nicodemus with the statement: ‘you must be born again of the Spirit’ (John 3:3-8). A new start is required.

God does not just want to mend the old ‘you’. In fact, as part of our salvation, he crucified (read ‘killed’) the old ‘you’, that is the one that was a slave to sin, and begun the work of making a new person altogether, one whose focus and locus are situated firmly in person and power of the resurrected Christ.

In Romans 12:2 and 2 Corinthians 3:18, the Greek word ‘metamorphoō ‘ is used, commonly translated ‘transformed’. In Romans 12, the emphasis is on allowing our minds to be renewed and transformed through offering ourselves to God. On the other hand, the 2 Corinthians passage speaks of transformation that is done through God’s Spirit, as we behold His glory. We look to Him and He changes us.

Transformation requires our co-operation and response to what God has wrought through His power and glory. We cannot generate our own transformation any more than a child can will himself to grow a few inches overnight. But when we choose to let God change and redeem us, our natures are transformed (2 Corinthians 5:17).

This is a change that is real and lasting. We see this in creation. A butterfly is not merely a caterpillar with wings; it is an entirely different creature. Within the tomb of its chrysalis, a transformation — metamorphosis — occurs, and what emerges is radically different. It is startling fact of science that a caterpillar eats only leaves and never drinks, whereas a butterfly never eats but survives by drinking nectar. Similarly, our whole outlook on life, what sustains us and feeds us, will be wholly different (Romans 8:5,6 cf John 4:13).

Therefore, Christian discipleship calls for a radical re-orientation of our lives. God doesn’t want part-time followers who ‘like’ what He says and does from time to time. Occasional visits to His house won’t do. No, He wants us as family, so much so that He’s signed our adoption papers. In fact, we share the full rights of son-ship as possessed by Christ, God’s perfect and righteous first-born.

This was God’s vision all along, not merely to reconcile us to Himself but to keep us in the security of His bosom as His very own, that we might glorify and enjoy Him forever. C. S. Lewis put it wonderfully: ‘The Son of God became a man to enable men to become sons of God.’

This is the real life that all disciples of Jesus seek to live out and to call those they live, work and play with, to likewise draw come and behold.

Who are you praying and seeking to share this radical new life with?

The New You. (By Manik Corea)