Family or Business? (By Isaac Lasky)

All of humanity is on a search for identity and meaning in their lives. Christians find their identity fundamentally in their relationship to God as Father. However our sinful nature does not allow to live that out unchallenged. Additionally, even among faithful Christians, there is a real temptation to find our identity, value and meaning in what we do for God rather than who we are in Him.

We may look like we are passionate, on-fire disciples, but we lack integrity and have misplaced our loyalty when, in effect, we have traded a ‘family’ relationship with God for a ‘business’ relationship with Him.

Tim Keller in his sermon ‘Basis of prayer: Our Father’ (1995)[i] shares very powerful truth about the difference between a family relationship and a business relationship and how we can know which one we have with God.

He says that there are, broadly speaking, two categories of relationship in our world today – business and family.

Business relationships are relationships that are built on an exchange of services. For example, a landlord rents out a house to a tenant, in exchange for a financial return. Your barber cuts your hair in exchange for money. The relationship exists because it is mutually beneficial for both parties. If one party does not keep up their side of the deal, the relationship is terminated and another similar relationship sought. There is also limited access in such a relationship. You can only request or expect communication about things that pertain to the business transaction.

In contrast, family relationships are built on an exchange of love. The relationship is not dependent on what the people do but rather who the people are. In a family relationship you have access to each other’s lives and seek to help and support each other in whatever way possible.

If you barber gives you a bad haircut it’s the end of the relationship and you get a new barber. But if your son breaks the window you get a new window, not seek a new son!

You can ask your mechanic to fix your car but you can’t ask him to help pay for your wedding. But you can ask your Dad to help fix your car and can ask him to help pay for your wedding.

When Jesus taught his disciples to pray to God as ‘Our Father’, it shows us that we are to relate to God as within a family relationship, and not a business relationship. In this, we have unprecedented access to the Father. Thus, we can ask for daily bread, deliverance from temptation, forgiveness of sins and whatever else we need. How incredible it is that we can call the awesome, sovereign and Holy Lord of Heaven ‘our Father’!

So, how do we know with which type of relationship – business or family – do we primarily relate to God with? Think about the last time you didn’t get a prayer answered in the way you wanted. How did you react and feel?

If you felt God was treating you unfairly (‘I did my part but you didn’t do yours’) or felt guilty (‘I’ve failed to please you so how can I expect you to hear my prayers’) then you are equating an unanswered (or differently-answered) prayer to a breakdown in an exchange of services.

We are then treating God like He owes, rather than owns us. We have reduced our prayer life to a formulae to get what we want from Him.

Evidence of a family relationship on the other hand would be when we approach God with love, humility and submission. We say like our Lord Jesus, ‘Lord, not my will but your will be done.’ ‘I know you are a good Father whose ways are higher than my ways.’ ‘Give me what I would pray for if I had your infinite power and infinite wisdom.’

What kind of relationship do you have with your Lord? Business or Family?

 


[i] You can listen to it at: https://player.fm/series/timothy-keller-sermons-podcast-by-gospel-in-life-83408/basis-of-prayer-our-father

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Family or Business? (By Isaac Lasky)

Help us bring a new NAMS Global Apprentice from India to Bangkok, Thailand

Help us bring a new NAMS Global Apprentice from India to Bangkok, Thailand

The NAMS Global Apprenticeship Program (GAP) exists to raise up the next generation of disciple-making leaders. Global apprentices live on site, train and grow in faith, experience and knowledge within the stimulating environments of one of our NAMS base communities.

John Gansalves is a young leader in India that we have identified would greatly benefit from being part of this program. God is calling him to serve at our base community in Bangkok, Thailand for a one year period. During his time with us, John will gain experience in cross cultural mission and ministry, be trained and equipped to be a disciple-making leader and serve the base community here through his many gifts and talents and the experience he brings of children and youth ministry in India.

During his exploratory trip to Bangkok in August 2017 it became very clear how the Lord could use John in the unique context we have to evangelise and disciple students, migrants and refugees.

Please pray for John and NAMS GAP as we seek to raise the $12,000 required for him to be a Global Apprentice in Bangkok, Thailand for the next twelve months.

If you would like to give towards his support, please go to the link below.

DONATE NOW!

Help us bring a new NAMS Global Apprentice from India to Bangkok, Thailand

The Next Companion? ( by Jon Shuler)

One of the central commitments of a NAMS Companion is to pray and labor in the Lord so that other men and women become Companions. We believe that Companions are called to change the world. How are we doing?

My years with NAMS have taught me that finding new Companions takes intentionality. We must look for signs that someone is being called to join us. But “seeing” them is not enough, we must ask them to join us. But first we need to recognize that God leads most of us through stages to a life calling, and we must be sensitive to where people are in their journey. It can take years to find God’s unique call for a lifetime.

These stages always begin when we meet someone who desires to be a disciple-making disciple of Christ Jesus, and we begin to disciple them. Many will go on to fruitful and faithful lives according to other specific ministries and callings, as the Lord directs, but some may be called to NAMS. What else do we look for?

Most of all we look to see if their heart for the Lord includes a growing awareness of the centrality of the Final Command (Mt 28:19)? Do they believe that they are obeying it where they now live, worship, and serve, or has the Holy Spirit lifted their “eyes up to the harvest” beyond them? For these ones, we have a special calling to pursue.

I have learned that the best next step is usually to explain the NAMS Centurion Project www.namscenturion.com and invite them to pray about joining us. This project is building an extended network of NAMS coworkers, who specifically undertake to be part of the wider community of Companions by beginning to live a simple “rule of life” derived from the NAMS Rule for Companions. There are divisions for men, women, and couples, but all start to walk a simple path of giving, praying and serving alongside NAMS Companions right where they live. These NAMS Centurions are becoming the very backbone of our global mission and ministry.

Another path, for younger and generally single disciples, is to join the NAMS Global Apprentice Program (GAP), and agree to serve for a year, or even two, in some part of the global NAMS mission field. This is an intense commitment, of course, but is sometimes the clearest sign God will give that we have found a future NAMS Companion, who will serve with us for life. Is GAP for you?

Perhaps the next most critical step, however, is that which leads someone to help us to found a base community somewhere in the world. A NAMS Base Community (NBC) is an intentional Christian community dedicated to modeling, incubating, training, and sending church planting missionaries into the harvest fields of the Lord Jesus. Led always by a small band of Companions,we pray daily to first have one of these NBCs in the fifteen mission mega regions of the world, and someday, in every nation on earth. We believe our NBCs are helping fulfill God’s plan to bring in the kingdom.

Are you called to be one of us? Will you help us change the world?

The Next Companion? ( by Jon Shuler)

Listen Slowly (by Revd Manik Corea)

How good are you at listening to your Lord?

Writer and pastor Chuck Swindoll tells of a particularly frantic time in his life when he was flustered and hurried by many appointments and commitments. He was gulping down his food at family meal-times, being short-tempted and irritated with his family and getting annoyed by unplanned interruptions. His family members began to get affected by his increased stress.

One evening, his youngest daughter said she wanted to tell him about something that happened at school that day, but said she would tell him ‘really fast.’ Realizing her frustration, he calmed her down and said, ‘Honey, you don’t have to rush. You can say it slowly.’ Swindoll says he’ll never forget her retort: ‘Then listen slowly.”

Are we listening ‘slowly’ to God?

Being a disciple of Jesus involves developing a keen sense of hearing – giving our undivided attention to the voice of God.

The listening ear is a door for faith to enter.

Thus Paul wrote ‘Faith comes by hearing and hearing through the Word of Christ.” (Romans 10:17). The Gospel must first be told us and heard and understood, to have effect.

But listening to God in Scripture must be a precursor to actual obedience and submission, or we will be condemned as many a Scripture warns (see Matthew 7:24-27; Luke 6:46; John 14:24; James 2:26; etc). Thus hearing and obedience are intimately linked in the Scripture.

I was surprised to learn recently that there is no Hebrew word that translates directly to the English word ‘obey’. The Hebrew word that most often equates to our English ‘obey’ is the word ‘shema’ which literally means to ‘hear’. However, this means more than just audibly receiving communication, but most often carries the meaning of ‘paying attention to’ and especially, ‘responding to what is heard.’[1]

Hebrew words typically stress concrete action, as opposed to Greek works which are more abstract. Thus, we understand ‘hearing’ as understanding or receiving a communication, whereas the Hebrews immediately made the link to obedience and action.

In a similar way, when a mother says to her child ‘You’re not really listening!’ she typically doesn’t mean her child has not heard her, but has not obeyed her.

To Jesus and then Jews, having ears is not simply a matter of being able to hear. It is a matter of being able to also understand and obey what is heard. Hence, Jesus so very often ended his sermons with the Hebraism, ‘to him who has ears, let him hear.’[2] He was looking for a right response.

As James so clearly and pithily instructs in James 1:22, ‘Do not merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves. Do what it says.’

And so, a simple definition of discipleship could be as follows: ‘A disciple is one who seeks everyday of his life to hear and obey Jesus’ words.’

To do what Jesus wants, we must truly ‘shema’ His Words.

Often. Carefully. Slowly.

 


[1] See this enlightening Word Study video on the word ‘Shema’ at https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=190&v=6KQLOuIKaRA

[2] Matthew 11:5; 13:9,43; Mark 4:9,23; 7:16; Luke 8:8; 14:35 cf Deuteronomy 29:4; Ezekiel 12:2).

Listen Slowly (by Revd Manik Corea)

NAMS Cuban Leadership training event

P and T are Cubans who have spent some time in our NAMS Base Community (NBC) in Temuco, Chile. There, they learned how to become disciple-making disciples. Now they are back in Cuba and have started reaching others. So far, they have gathered 17 people in their homes – people of different backgrounds, professions and ages, but all being drawn to the light of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

TheHabanaCuba
Base community in The Habana, Cuba

Consequently, at the end of September this year, 4 NAMS leaders from Chile will be in Cuba to offer further training to P and T, and to around 40 other local leaders and pastors, on how to effectively make disciples, raise leaders and plant fruitful churches.

The estimated total cost that for the 3-day training event in this impoverished nation totals US$7,800 which includes flights to take our team there, local transportation cost for participants (some will travel from a long way), food and accommodation for 3 days and video/materials to record training sessions and to continue to resource them.

PLEASE will you PRAY for this event AND consider GIVING specifically towards it. You will be partnering with us to invest in God’s mission in a very specific way this June in Cuba. We will be able to send you a follow-up report after the meetings to let you know how it went.

To join us in supporting this exciting event, click on this link

https://tithe.ly/pledge/#/campaign/313066

and you can indicate your gift. To send a check direct or make a bank transfer to our NAMS account (USA only), please contact us at info@namsnetwork.com for details.

You can also check the progress of this fundraising campaign at

https://tithe.ly/pledge/#/progress/313066

Thank you,
Rev Manik Corea
NAMS Global Executive

NAMS Cuban Leadership training event

On the (Gospel) Road to Mandalay (By Revd Manik Corea)

Mandalay boatsAt the beginning of this month, 3 NAMS Companions and one NAMS Global Apprentice from Jacksonville, Florida, USA and Bangkok, Thailand left for Myanmar. Our destination was the 2nd largest city in Myanmar, the old royal capital of Mandalay with its iconic Mandalay Palace surrounded by a moat and multi-cultural influence.

This was the second NAMS team to visit Mandalay at the invitation of Anglican Bishop David Nyi Nyi Naing, who is also a NAMS Guardian Bishop, following our first trip in August 2016. This time, we shared and taught most of the clergy from the Archdeaconry of Mandalay, along with a few ordinands and the heads of the various Diocesan departments.

Our aim on this visit was to lay the foundation for a new NAMS Base Community (NBC) out of which to partner with the Diocese to make disciple-making disciples, raise disciple-making leaders and help them ultimately plant more disciple-making congregations in the unreached people groups and regions of their Diocese.

P1020755

We taught on topics like ‘the kind of disciples Jesus wants’ (after John 8:31; 13:34,35 and 15:8); ‘obeying the final command of Jesus’ (Matthew 28:18-20) and how to mobilize the local church to join in the Mission of God, to reach a lost world. We did practical sharing and training on how to disciple and reach young people through community outreach like sports ministry, the arts and education.

There was also some very practical teaching by NAMS Trainer Clay Hamrick on how to tell your story of faith or testimony in under 3 minutes and how to share the Gospel using the 3 circle diagram method.[1] Additionally, we had participants go out on the streets of Mandalay to prayer-walk one evening, something most of the clergy and lay-leaders had never done. This led to some encouraging feedback the next morning.

An outcome of this visit was that we have identified and will be working with a number of key clergy and lay-leaders to lay the foundation for a new NAMS base in Mandalay in partnership with the Diocese of Mandalay. We thank God for the welcome and partnership in the Gospel that we are building with these brothers and sisters.

This envisioning trip to Mandalay is an example of the kind of pioneering mission work that all NAMS Companions are called to. Years ago, God gave us a charge through the retired Anglican Archbishop of South-East Asia Moses Tay that has guided our work ever since. He called us to attend to 4 things primarily. NAMS Companions are always to:

‘Preach and teach ‘Jesus Christ and Him crucified’;
‘Plant churches wherever God opens the door’;
‘Obey the Holy Spirit’ and
‘Never break the Word of God.’

Our primary strategy then is to send or raise up NAMS Companions in a given location to establish a NAMS Base Community where God opens the door. From there, we model, grow, train and send disciple-makers and church-planters in partnership with other churches.

To do this, we need your help and partnership to pray with us to be faithful and for more laborers, for work God has called us to in Mandalay and in many parts of the world. If you would like to be a NAMS Global Intercessor and receive once-a-month prayer updates, please write to Mary Garrison at mary.garrison@namsnetwork.com

If you would like to give a dedicated and exclusive gift towards our the establishing of a new NAMS Base Community in Mandalay, please use this link:

https://tithe.ly/pledge/#/campaign/311251

Thank you

 

 


[1] You can watch Clay teach the 3 circles method here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOtaVvCZBGE

On the (Gospel) Road to Mandalay (By Revd Manik Corea)

Mending our Nets (by Pastor Prince Thomas)

Recently, the Lord has been teaching me some lessons from Luke Chapter 5:1-11, about ‘net breaking blessings’. In this passage, we read the very interesting story of Peter working hard and fishing all night but catching nothing. Although he would have been very discouraged and upset, we read in verse 2 that he and the other fishermen were nevertheless still washing and mending their nets for another try. What are some lessons?

Firstly He was mending his net. After fishing all night, Peter’s net might have been torn or damaged. Fishermen need to repair their nets before they go to their work again. If there is big hole in the net, the fish may easily escape after being caught. One of the questions I felt the Lord ask me was “If there is a big hole in the net, would Peter have received his big miracle from God?” Even if God should grant, as He did, a big catch, the fish would not be free. God is waiting for us to mend our nets before He performs miracles in our lives.

Peter mended his broken net. This is the basic requirement for a divine breakthrough. Many of us want God to use us or bless us. But do we take the time to examine or check ourselves to see if we need repairs done in areas of our walk and relationship with God, with family, leaders, the church or anyone else?

It is sad in our day to hear preachers interpret the Word according to popular fads and lifestyle.  There is an abundance of people-pleasing sermons where themes like sin, judgment, forgiveness and the righteousness of God are not heard. They are not popular messages compared to topics like blessings and breakthrough. But we must preach the Gospel and the message of salvation inside and outside our churches.

David prayed in Psalms 26:2, ‘Examine me, O LORD, and prove me; try my reins and my heart.’ (KJV)

When prodigal son returned to father in Jesus’ parable in Luke 15:21, he confessed his sins to his father. Forgiveness always brings Transformation.

Second we see Peter obeyed what Jesus asked him to do. Though he knew very well that there were few or no fish to be caught by that sea shore, he did not argue. Instead he simply obeyed what Jesus asked of him. And he found the net was full of fishes. Obedience is better than sacrifices (1 Samuel 15:22).

A net breaking blessing is awaiting us if we are able mend our nets (i.e. examine ourselves, repent) and obey the word of Jesus. May the Lord help us to do both and be blessed of Him.

 

— Prince Thomas is a NAMS Companion serving in Haryana, North India.
He has been involved in starting and leading an a vibrant church-planting movement there for the last 20 years. He is originally from Kerala, South India.

Mending our Nets (by Pastor Prince Thomas)